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Shoulder to the literary wheel

I've been flailing away at a follow-on to yesterday's post about eclexia but it's just not coming together. I'm thinking I need to pull back and take a more organized approach to it, since it's a little long and involved for the usual ranting & raving, and I don't feel like throwing it out there in the beta version for people to comment on before it's somewhat coherent.

Meanwhile, Ed Driscoll has a post about how rock music has basically stagnated since the 1980s. I'm not sure I agree with this completely, but I think there's something to what he and Jonah Goldberg are saying. A lot of new music, frankly, isn't all that great. With the exception of Kid Rock, the white rap-rock acts stink on ice. That genre's pretty much the only new thing in rock since Metallica and other hardcore metal bands drove the hair metal bands out of the temple of rock back in the 90s...the rest of what gets played on the modern rock stations is just imitations and rehashes of the same old same old. Even Zakk Wylde sounds for all the world like the young Ozzy...if the Ozzman had had the talent and breadth to do country and gospel, way back when.
Another factor in this is that kids today don't feel obligated to do the knee-jerk automatic rebellion thing and reject everything their parents liked. (Check out Michele's boy, for example.) They may not buy into everything we like, but I find it interesting that phoenixalpha has the same catholic (note the small c) tastes in music I do; she listens to a lot of electronica, which I also did at her age, but doesn't moan "oh, no..."any more when she hears James McMurtry or Devo. Lot of other kids in their shoes, too...they recognize good music and want more of it.
I don't think this is going to last forever, though; music trends never do. What I do think is going to happen is that today's kids are going to use file sharing and other Internet apps to spread the good word about bands they like, and a lot more bands will be playing decent gigs in bars and clubs and small venues. You're still going to have tours by the Rolling Stones and Fleetwood Mac and Ozzfest, but I think eventually all the geezers are going to die off and the next generation of rockers is going to come along and play something different...or we'll have a renaissance of lounge music, or maybe classical will become all the rage. Whatever happens, it's going to be interesting - and funky.