wombat_socho (wombat_socho) wrote,
wombat_socho
wombat_socho

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The problem with locavores

Virginia Postrel on Locavores and Michael Pollan - WSJ.com:
This cornucopia of choice and convenience is a tribute to logistical ingenuity and gains from trade, the very progress the local-food movement is sworn to overturn. For those of us blessed with a Mediterranean climate, giving up imports means higher prices. For everyone else, it means a far more limited diet. New Yorkers sometimes complain about farmers' markets that seem to sell only varieties of apples. Were they expecting locally grown oranges and mangoes? Coffee and spices from the plantations of East Hampton?

The local-food movement's ideological parochialism would be dangerous if it were somehow enacted into law. But as persuasion, it tends to focus on the positive: the delights of local peaches and fresh cider, not the imagined evils of Chilean blueberries and prepeeled baby carrots. In this regard, it resembles the English Arts and Crafts movement of the late 19th century. William Morris, who is remembered today more for his wallpaper and book designs than for hjs social theories, didn't manage to overturn the industrial revolution. But he and his allies left a legacy of beautiful things. Pleasure is persuasive.


This is pretty much how I feel about the whole locavore thing. I like the idea of encouraging people to eat locally produced food, but putting social pressure on them to do so is just obnoxious. Trying to put laws in effect to compel it on any scale (or subsidize it, for that matter) is evil. RTWT.
(Instapundit)
Tags: culture w/o politics, food
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